Knowing the audience in 2015

One of my most interesting writing projects in 2015 was developing a new brochure for parents of children with epilepsy. The marketing goal was to educate this group of parents about the benefits of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Therapy (VNS) as an option to help reduce the occurrence and severity of seizures. But I appreciated the opportunity to ‘know the audience’ before beginning to write the new promotional piece.

I visited Great Ormond Street Hospital, Southampton Children’s Hospital and the Neville Childhood Epilepsy Centre to meet with nurses, parents and children with epilepsy who were using VNS therapy. Through surveys and interviews, I learned what it’s like to care for children with epilepsy and how treatment decisions are made. Some of the insights gained were new to the client, so valuable in and of themselves. Most importantly, I was able to write the new brochure in a way that reflected the target audience’s specific situations and addressed their concerns.

‘Know your audience’ is a theme for me because I believe it’s critical for effective communication. Sometimes there is no budget or time for hearing first-hand from a target audience, but the marketing results are usually poorer for it. I was pleased this client understood the importance of finding out what the target customers already knew and where knowledge gaps existed. And I’m happy to say the new brochure copy hits the mark.

curare bambini

Healthy communication

Informing and empowering customers to make the best purchase decisions is a worthy goal for marketing communicators. I agree with a recent essay from Captive Health that this is essential for health care communication as well. Educating patients about how to avoid disease and manage ongoing conditions is not only the right thing to do, it also saves money.  In fact, the author argues that providing information should be considered part of medical therapy and therefore standard practice.

In most aspects of life, informed decisions result in better outcomes. We know that if a customer chooses to buy a particular product or service based on inaccurate or incomplete information, she will regret it later. So while marketing communicators want to share positive messages about their clients or companies, it’s important to recognize that audiences are savvy and want the full picture. We’re all consumers of health care services so we want to know what our medical options are and the pros and cons of each.

According to Captive Health, more education for both health care providers and patients is needed to help them engage in fruitful discussions about medical management options together. The more we talk to our health care professionals about the risks and benefits of various interventions, the more informed we’ll be to make healthy decisions. It’s not easy to prioritize honest dialogue throughout the health decision making process when appointment times are tight and budgets even tighter. But the improvements in health outcomes and financial savings that arise from empowered patients demonstrate why better health communication is a worthy goal.

I’ve written in a previous blog post that effective communication helps customers clearly understand what they’re buying into so they are happy to take action and even recommend the same to others. What might happen if you give your customers all the information they need to make the right decisions for themselves? Educating and empowering your audience to do what’s best for them may be the right thing to do and may earn you more loyal business in the long run.

Captive Health report